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Category Archives: Book of Mormon

  • On Maintaining and Losing Our Humanity: A Latter-day Saint Manifesto

    humanity 2This article is posted on ldsliberty.org.
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    In the Book of Mormon, the prophet Lehi counseled his son Jacob that “men are that they might have joy” (2 Ne 2:25). In other words, men exist that they may have joy. Some 300 years later and around the globe in Greece, Aristotle would later argue that the most basic motivation for human action is eudaimonia (commonly translated as “happiness” or “human flourishing”). For Aristotle, as also it seems with the prophet Lehi, eudaimonia constituted a human being’s final cause (one of four “causes” that defines what a thing is as opposed to another thing: the purpose for an object’s existence). This means that

  • A Lesson in Reading Scripture

    As I studied and took the class necessary to becJesus Christome a full-time Seminary instructor for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints last year (a full-time religious education teaching position for high school aged students), we were instructed, among many things, on how to approach the scriptural text. When approaching and teaching the text, there were four levels of analysis/understanding that were presented

  • ETB: An Enemy Hath Done This, Chapter 8: “The Proper Role of Government,” pgs 125-148

    Ezra Taft Benson, An Enemy Hath Done This, Chapter 8: “The Proper Role of Government,” pgs 125-148.
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    I have said, very many times… that no man believed more than I in the principles of self-government; that it lies at the bottom of all my ideas of just government,; that it lies at the bottom of all my ideas of just government, from beginning to end… I believe each individual is naturally entitled to do as he pleases with himself and the fruit of his labor, so far as it in no wise interferes with any other’s rights — that each community, as a State, has a right to do exactly as it pleases with all the concerns within that State that interfere with the rights of no other State, and that the general government, upon principle, has no right to interfere with anything other than the general class of things that does concern the whole (Abraham Lincoln, July 10, 1858; Collected Works 2:493).

    My fellow Americans: I stand before you tonight humbly grateful to God for the blessings we all enjoy as citizens of these great United States of America. I am grateful for our founding fathers who were raised up with the courage to give their lives, with the unselfishness to give their fortunes, and the vision to pledge their sacred honor, in order to establish a new kind of government of their own choosing where men might be free. I am additionally grateful that these founding fathers had the faith and humility to accept the divine inspiration so necessary in setting for a Constitution as the foundation for their new Republic.

  • “Render Unto Caesar…”

    The example of Christ’s “rendering unto Caesar” is a topic that I have studied but never written about. As it inevitably comes with any discussion concerning the philosophy of liberty and scripture, I have recently seen the benefit of writing on the subject. Whereas this passage of scripture is typically spoken of in discussions concerning government’s legitimate/illegitimate ability to lay taxes upon its people, I believe that there is a more profound and typically ignored message that often answers the taxation argument implicitly. The taxation argument is as old as government itself, and, quite frankly, I am bored with it – so, hopefully I can present a coherent message concerning this scripture without getting bogged down in the never-ending discussion of taxation.

    “Choose ye this Day…”

    Throughout the scriptures, the Lord has always asked his people – even his children – to choose a side. In all instances, God always allows man’s moral and free agency to choose his own will – whether to captivity and death or to liberty and life (2 Ne 2:27).

  • The Final Stage of Testimony

    In a previous article I wrote concerning the nature, order, and power of a true testimony. A testimony is an account given by a witness who has firsthand knowledge, and whose testimony is made true through sure evidence. As the world classifies and substantiates various forms of evidence, the Holy Ghost is the sure witness of a true and eternal testimony. It is through the evidence of the Holy Ghost that knowledge becomes truth. Once truth is established, there is a fundamental process through which the possessor of truth will follow.

  • Hugh Nibley: Preventive War and the Book of Mormon

    The YouTube video(s) (part 1, and part 2) of Hugh Nibley’s discourse on preventive war and the Book of Mormon has been posted in various places. However, it is difficult to find a definitive source that offers a text of Nibley’s statement. I found a text, and I am re-posting it here for those interested in reading it.

    Is Preemptive War A Christian Principle?

    By Hugh Nibley

    There is no possibility of confrontation here between Good and Bad. This is best shown in Alma’s duel with Amlici. The Amlicites are described as coming on in all the hideous and hellish trappings of one of our more colorful rock groups, glorying in the fiendish horror of their appearance (see Alma 3: 4-6). Alma on the other hand is the “man of God” (Alma 2: 30) who meets the monster Amlici “with the sword, face to face” (Alma 2: 29), and of course wins.

  • The World’s Need for a True Testimony

    In what is often called “Alma’s soliloquy,” an ancient prophet of God once spoke of his desire to express his testimony:

    O that I were an angel, and could have the wish of mine heart, that I might go forth and speak with the trump of God, with a voice to shake the earth, and cry repentance unto every people!

    Yea, I would declare unto every soul, as with the voice of thunder, repentance and the plan of redemption, that they should repent and come unto our God, that there might not be more sorrow upon all the face of the earth. (Alma 29:1-2).

    What good is a testimony?

    As with all gospel principles, a testimony is an entirely individualistic witness gained from personally obtained evidence, yet it is necessarily communal in its bearing and witness. In other words, as we learn in the parable of the ten virgins (Matt 25:1-13), we must obtain our own spiritual and testimonial oil to light our symbolic fires, yet our testimony — to be a real testimony — is gained in its witness to others. It is interesting this dualistic nature of the gospel, that while we are to wear out our lives in good causes individually, we necessarily need our brothers and sisters to accomplish our individual growth.